Her Lovely Heart

January 27, 2015

Style Files / 2 / Fuchsia & denim

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light Photography.

I went through a pretty radical hair change last week, so these images already feel a little bit like the ‘old me’. It’s crazy how quickly a huge external change can affect our self image! I can’t wait to try how this fuchsia dress will go with my new bleached blond look.

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light Photography.

This is my ‘waiting for spring’ outfit. Bright colours are keeping me inspired at the moment, and I’ve pretty much lived in these trainers for the whole winter.

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light Photography.
Dress: Asos | Denim jacket: TU by Sainsbury’s | Dotted leggings: H&M | Shoes: Adidas

Photography: Caught the Light Photography
Make-up: Elbie van Eeden


Her Lovely Heart


January 26, 2015

Ask Marianne / 19 / How to stay excited about running your business

Q: How to stay excited about running your own business. Click through to read.
In this series, Her Lovely Heart founder Marianne Taylor answers some of the burning questions submitted by blog readers, spanning everything from photography and business questions to personal mantras. Read on to find out what people are longing to know about…

Q: I’m a carpenter and I’ve been an entrepreneur for 12 years now. I feel like I’m still struggling to make ends meet and to feel fulfilled. I find the idea of working for someone else depressing, but I don’t know how to feel excited about my business, when it’s at the mercy of low demand and low market prices. How do you keep going and stay inspired to run your own business?

Congratulations! You have taken your business a lot further than the majority of people who embark on the entrepreneurial life. The harsh reality is that most small businesses fail, and it takes a lot of work, vision and the right kind of spirit to push through into longevity. So you have certainly proven yourself to possess the right qualities to be an entrepreneur just by staying in the game for so long.

What I do hear in between the lines is that, while you might have the right ingredients to push through and keep your business going, you might lack some clear focus about where exactly you want your business to be. It sounds a little bit like you’re letting your business run you, rather than the other way around. Certainly there are different fields where it’s harder to rise above being a service provider, and areas where the economic climate creates challenges, and it sounds like your chosen field might be one where it’s a little bit more difficult to stand out. I’d still argue there are always ways to differentiate yourself and your business by having a unique core product, and by making efforts to think differently about the way you market your business and/or the way you provide your services.

Here are some ways I personally try to keep those entrepreneurial fires burning:

1. Reassess your focus

I try to reassess my focus often, and not be afraid of readjusting my course when I feel the pull to do so. There is certainly value in consistency, but if you are in business to achieve a certain lifestyle (rather than building a business with the view of growing or selling it), I think it’s vital to listen to yourself and where your energy is pulling you towards. The biggest successes tend to happen when you are doing something you feel passionate about.

2. Come up with new products or ways of providing a service

You don’t need to change the whole concept every time you start feeling dispirited, but even just rethinking the kind of product or service you provide can give you a fresh kick of inspiration and rejuvenate your business.

Having a skill set of a carpenter seems like such an exciting opportunity to me. I don’t know how you are utilising those skills at the moment, but it sounds like it is more as a service provider rather than an artisan. One way to ignite that fire could be to try to leverage both sides of your craft and add an artisan element to what you do. Perhaps you could join forces with an up-and-coming designer to come up with a completely new concept for an every day item, and start marketing that through social media? To begin with, you could do something like this slowly on the side in order to test the market without having to change the core of your business, which is keeping you afloat at the moment. Even if it wouldn’t result in a successful product, I bet it would give your creativity a boost and make you appreciate the things you love about your craft. Do also browse through the ever-growing archive on tips on how to generate new ideas to help you come up with ways to stay inspired and innovate new ways to approach you business.

3. Remember to take time out

It’s easy to work around the clock, and without holidays, when you are feeling the pressure of keeping your business afloat. But sometimes the best thing to do is to take some time out in order to clear your head and allow space for new ideas. So take a few days and just sit and watch the ocean, or read books not related to your field or travel to a different culture if you have the means to do so. You’ll find that having some time off from your routine and everyday thoughts will give you a different perspective, and can jolt something in you that could be vital for the future of your business.

4. Don’t fear failure

I think there are many things you can do before there would be a reason to give up on your business, but what I do want to put out there is this: if you do come to a point where, despite everything you’ve tried, you are not making enough of an income and your business is not providing you with any joy, there is no shame in deciding to walk away and try something else. There are so many ways you can navigate the entrepreneurial life, but if you can honestly say that no aspect of your business, or the possibilities of what your business could be, excites you, that’s the time to fundamentally change things. It’s not called failure, it’s called having one short life and not wasting it doing something that doesn’t nourish you in any way.

Do you have a question about photography or running a business for Marianne? You can email your questions to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Ask Marianne’. The best questions will be answered on the blog throughout this series.
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 23, 2015

PROfile / 11 / Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.
PROfile is a series of interviews with artists and creative souls who have built businesses around their craft and passion. We’ll dig deeper to try and find out everything you could want to know from seasoned pros who have experienced the full gamut of highs and lows that come from running a creative business.

This week we interviewed Natala Stuetz, Australia-based creative genius behind the stationery brand Ma and Grandy.

What was your first ‘proper’ job and how did you land it? Was it what you intended to do as a career?

My first ‘proper’ job was working for a children’s fashion label. It combined many loves including illustration, design, fashion and art direction. It wasn’t what I intended to do for a career but it was a great experience to see a concept transform into a selling product.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

Has design always been in your blood?

Yes, always. At school, art was always a favourite subject and eventually choosing to study graphic design was the best decision I made for a career. I come from a gene pool of builders, artists, dancers and interior designers, so my family has always helped to cultivate creativity.

How did you know you were ready to have your own business?

After spending 8 years working in corporate land, it can eventually drain your soul. So, I think I just knew the timing was right! I started staying up late creating my own designs, until it soon became evident that I should turn my hobby into a little business.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

How did you go about starting your own business?

It took me two years to develop Ma and Grandy. It seemed like forever, but I’m glad I took my time in developing the look and style I wanted. Nailing the logo was crucial as it dictated the style of everything else. I then tested my designs on family and friends, and went through several rounds before launching the first collection through my online store.

How did you secure your first clients?

My first stockists came from email inquiries. I didn’t do any major promotion, but managed to feature on a few popular blogs and then word got out through social media. I’ve been so lucky to have friends in the industry who have plugged me on instagram and facebook too which is where most of my stockists have found me.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

Ma and Grandy is one of the most innovative brands I’ve come across, how did you come up with the concept?

Thank you so much! It all started when I visited my family down in Canberra. Before Grandy (my grandfather) passed away last year, I went there for a holiday and was sorting through all of his photos. I came across this beautiful image of him with Ma, my grandmother, and I knew I had to do something with it. I’m a bit of a sentimental person. Grandy said to me, ‘we first met at a local church hall dance, she had spent all day making a dress for the night, and proceeded to be late. Her hair was still wet and she rocks up at this hall and I saw her from across the way, and I thought that was the girl for me’ (laughs) it was really cute, so it was just a beautiful story and I’m a total romantic at heart. So the concept formed from their story, combined with my love of greeting cards and hand-drawn typography.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

What is your typical daily routine like?

Each day can be so different. I start work around 9ish and like to work late into the night too. The day generally consists of my corporate freelance business designing anything from a logo to a printed brochure. Then, I’ll be processing and packing Ma and Grandy orders and then off to the Post Office. On a really good day, I might get to design for a new collection or collaborate with another creative which is always a treat.

What traits do artists have that help with running a business?

I think a common trait of an artist is being a perfectionist. You want to produce the best results possible and take pride in the little and big aspects of your business.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

How do you decide which suppliers to use?

Sometimes, it can be a stab in the dark, you try one and it fails, so you try another and another until you are happy with the product and the price. I really like supporting small businesses and therefore try to source my products locally. I never like to go straight for the cheapest product – I look for quality, good service and attention to detail. In the long term, you want a reliable product.

What’s been the most beneficial business decision you’ve made?

Outsourcing administration work. I’m painfully bad at it and it frees up my time to work on designing.

Artists and writers often describe the compulsion to work – do you experience an overwhelming desire to create something new?

Yes and no. Most of the time I enjoy creating something new, but you can also go through dry seasons when nothing excites you and the only remedy is coffee and a ‘just get the job done’ attitude.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

Do you ever feel alone in your work?

Yes, absolutely. As I work from home, this can be a little isolating. Networking, social media and collaborating with other creatives are the best cures for keeping you in the loop and keeping you sane. I found it to be so beneficial to make an effort to meet with other people in the industry – talk about the highs and lows of business.

How do you relax?

A glass of wine, a good movie and spending time with dear friends.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

Where do you find inspiration?

Oh! Everywhere and anything. But I do love watching an old film. This gets me in the “Ma and Grandy’ mood and often the style of language used in old films and musicals can spark ideas.

What advice would you give to your 21-year-old self?

Don’t worry so much about what other people think! That bright orange billabong tshirt is not your colour and is a hideous shape on you. Don’t buy it just because ‘everybody else’ is wearing billabong ☺

What would you like to be remembered for?

That I was unique and proud to be, that I loved others and brought some happiness to the world through my designs.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

What’s been the best moment of your career so far?

Winning an art competition, getting picked by film director Baz Luhrmann and meeting him and his amazing creative team!

What is the most rewarding part of your job?

Visiting the art gallery for ‘research’ and hearing that I helped make someone’s day with a Ma and Grandy card or an instagram post.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

What have been the biggest challenges or obstacles you’ve faced in your business and how did you overcome them?

The feeling you get when nobody is telling you to do this or that. It’s all your motivation; you can let the ball drop at any time because it’s your business. I stay motivated by working with others and learning from the experts.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

Never stop learning.

If you could have dinner with any inspiring person (past or present), who would you choose?

Can I pick two? Without a doubt, Baz Luhrmann and Oscar winning designer Catherine Martin. I’d love to pick their brains and discuss their glorious films.

PROfile interview with Natala Stuetz of Ma and Grandy. Click through to read.

You can see more of Natala’s work on the Ma and Grandy website, and follow her colourful life via Instagram and Twitter.

Her Lovely Heart


January 22, 2015

Thru Your Lens workshop Class of January 2015

Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.

On Monday we held our first ever Thru Your Lens photography workshop with Nick Ray, and to be honest, we could’t have asked for a better day. We had the loveliest group of people, perfect weather, and a beautiful venue. Here’s to many more workshops to come!

Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.

Couldn’t have a workshop without some Fairy Nuff Flower blooms…

Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.

Look at me hand lettering the name tags on the goodie bags!

Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.

Here’s what one of our brilliant (and gorgeous!) attendees, Julie, had to say:

It was a brilliant day of filling technical knowledge gaps, as well as a wonderful opportunity to meet and throw questions at two talented and experienced photographers whose work I have long admired, and whose success is something to aspire to! A thoroughly enjoyable day in a relaxed and open environment, where no question goes unanswered and practical advice is passed on willingly!

Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.
Her Lovely Heart Tru Your Lens photography workshop by Marianne Taylor and Nick Ray.

Images by Marianne Taylor & Nick Ray.


Her Lovely Heart


January 21, 2015

Quote of the Week / 20

‘When the grass looks greener on the other side of the fence,
it may be that they take better care of it there.’
~ Cecil Selig

Quote of the Week hand lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Mari Orr.
This Quote of the Week reminds us of something pretty important. It doesn’t pay to envy others, the best way to thrive is to shift your focus on how well you are taking care of your own patch in life. Turning your focus has the double effect of not letting comparison steal your joy, plus actually spending your energy on things that help your own growth instead of stalling it.

You can also download this quote, beautifully hand lettered by Mari Orr, as a gorgeous desktop wallpaper.
Free Cecil Selig quote wallpaper hand lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Mari Orr. Click to download.

Free Cecil Selig quote wallpaper hand lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Mari Orr. Click to download.

Designed for Her Lovely Heart by Mari Orr. You can also find her on Instagram.

Click here to download this beautiful Quote Wallpaper by Mari Orr: Download

 
Do you have a design you’d like to submit for our Goodie Bag? Create one design, or example of a digital product, and email it to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Goodie Bag’. We’ll review your submission and get back to you if it’s a good fit for the site!
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 20, 2015

Ask Marianne / 18 / Fighting creative slump with an inspiration jar

Using an inspiration jar to overcome a creative slump. Click through to read!
In this series, Her Lovely Heart founder Marianne Taylor answers some of the burning questions submitted by blog readers, spanning everything from photography and business questions to personal mantras. Read on to find out what people are longing to know about…

Q: I often find myself feeling uninspired when it comes to my creative work and my business. I feel like everything has been done already, and like I’m failing at being original. I don’t know if it’s the time of year or just that I’ve ran out of ideas. Help!

First of all, don’t worry, you’ll never run out of ideas! There’s literally infinite ways you can connect the dots and come up with different ways of looking at things, it’s just a case of having an arsenal of tools at your disposal to help you with the process. I’m going to give you a seemingly familiar method, but with a twist, which adds a randomised element to the proceedings.

I want you to pick a box or a large jar, a container of some sort that will fit a good amount of clippings and other materials. Then, start collecting ideas from all around you. Put in ads you like, pictures and magazine stories that inspire you, little items you find, paint swatches, quotes, cartoons, drawings, or anything else that catches your eye.

When you next find yourself lacking inspiration, and in search of ideas, put your hand in your file and pull out a couple of items – randomly. Now, the randomness is an important factor, don’t try to pick two items consciously. What we’re trying to do is to get your brain to connect random things you’ve found inspiring with each other, and in the process coming up with something completely new.

Perhaps you’ll pull out a business card with a design you liked and a pebble you’ve collected from a beach in Cornwall. In what ways could you combine these two things into a new idea? Perhaps the shapes and textures of the pebble, combined with the shapes and colours of the design will give you an idea for a new piece of art. Or maybe you could use pebbles as business cards, hand lettering your information on a beautiful, smooth and tactile surface would certainly make you stand out. Or you can approach your inspiration in a more abstract manner, seeing how you could capture the feeling of a day on the beach with a clean design for your new website. It’s even better if you focus your ideas on something you are trying to find an answer for at the moment.

I hope this helps in some small way to get over your creative slump!

P.S. remember that sometimes you do simply need some time out in order to refresh your creative engine, so do allow yourself a day or two of doing, and thinking, nothing once in a while.

Do you have a question about photography or running a business for Marianne? You can email your questions to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Ask Marianne’. The best questions will be answered on the blog throughout this series.
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 16, 2015

PROfile / 10 / Brian Morrow of Shark Pig

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
PROfile is a series of interviews with artists and creative souls who have built businesses around their craft and passion. We’ll dig deeper to try and find out everything you could want to know from seasoned pros who have experienced the full gamut of highs and lows that come from running a creative business.

This week we are interviewing filmmaker Brian Morrow, who, along with his business partner Jonathan Lynch, runs Shark Pig, one of the most on-demand production companies based in Los Angeles.

What was your first ‘proper’ job and how did you land it? Was it what you intended to do as a career?

I’ve had so many MANY jobs in my life. All of them were weird, but none of them were what I thought would become my career. That includes the one that ended up becoming my career: Shark Pig. I sort of thought that I was failing on the dream of becoming a Hollywood filmmaker when I started making these cutesie little super 8 wedding videos. Little did I know it would be that which lead me through a long set of opportunities and ultimately became my career. To actually answer your question, I think my first job was being a paperboy in my neighbourhood in Cheyenne.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Smilebooth

Has art always been in your blood?

I’m not sure. I basically didn’t have a formed brain until I was already out of college. I was more of a spinning insane person back then, full of energy and up to no good. Back then being… I guess about the first 25 years of my life.

How did you get into filmmaking?

I really got addicted to it when I started working with some friends in college on some shorts. We dove head first into narrative film making, without really knowing a damn thing about it. It was fun, and tiring, and frustrating and intensely fulfilling. I’m lucky enough to still work with some of those original crew. Their collaboration means the world to me.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Jill Mitchell

How did you go about starting your own business?

The whole thing kind of fell in my lap. I had made a few wedding videos, and someone at an ad agency who happened to be planning her own wedding was watching one at work. Her creative director saw over her shoulder and said that she liked the editing, and asked who had made it. She called me up and asked if I would like to do some event coverage for a big weird conference in New Orleans. After ranting and raving at the conference about how I am capable of making full blown films and what not, she gave me the opportunity to bid on a larger scale campaign. We landed that job, and that was how I was able to really start the actual production company with my business partner, Jonathan Lynch. So I guess… dumb luck?

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Smilebooth

How did you secure your first clients?

All of our initial clients came from the marketing platform that The Flashdance (a collective of creatives you can book as a package to cover your event) provided me. Even before I started cutting wedding films, I would do silly little promo stuff for that crew, so they were happy to put my stuff on blast. I think the films also made the crew a more well rounded collective. But it was through that initial collaboration, and the other free or for trade work that we did just to get the name out there.

Here's for a luxury eyewear brand I work with, Leisure Society.

What is your typical daily routine like?

I have almost no routine at all. I’ve been traveling so much that I think I might just blow up or drop dead or something. I think I need to start a routine. That’s a good idea. Thank you for asking. I’ll try that.

What traits do artists have that help with running a business?

I feel like usually the traits that artists have are the ones that make it MORE difficult to run a business. Artists (myself included) want to meander around, dreaming up projects, having coffee and wine and what not. Business owners need to respond to emails, pay their damn taxes, and keep things legit. It’s a rare type of person who can manage both, but make no mistake – it’s fully about being able to execute tasks on both sides. Luckily I have a very pragmatic business partner who lets me and my mind meander. But I also understand the importance of growing holistically.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.

You work on a variety of different projects from commercial work to weddings. How do these commissions differ and do you have a favourite kind of job?

For me, I just need different things to satisfy my ADD. Hahaha. Seriously though. I can’t work on any one thing for too long without going a little bonkers. I have a system to help me figure out which jobs to take and which jobs to decline. The criteria mostly has to do with which jobs will generate the greatest potential energy for the company. Maybe that sounds vague, but the full explanation would be too boring to read without crying and then dying. You’d be bored to tears and then death.

Here's a spot I did for UGG. I'm IN the thing a lot too, but just my feet. Hahaha.

What’s been the most beneficial business decision you’ve made?

To partner with Lynch (pictured below). He is the MAN! He was my best friend for a long time, so I trust him completely. I also care for his well being deeply and want the quality of life for him and his family to always grow. Those two things combined make him an amazing other half so to speak. Not only do I know I can depend on him, but I am also inspired to keep hustling because of him.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Lou Mora

Artists and writers often describe the compulsion to work – do you experience an overwhelming desire to create something new?

I don’t even do cocaine and I feel like I’m bursting with ‘great ideas’. Hahaha. I’m sure some of them are really not that great, but nonetheless, I am constantly day dreaming about a concept, a story, a business idea, a marketing stunt or a party. Something. The trick is actually DOING some of them. I’m not the type to be very effective in that capacity on my own. So my collaborators are very important to me.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Geoff Boothby

Do you ever feel alone in your work?

Like crying and hugging a pillow? No. I’m never alone. I actually need some alone time. I think I’ll try that. Thank you for asking. I’ll do it.

How do you relax?

Oh well… I usually just freak out, have a mental breakdown, then sleep 15 hours a day for a couple days. I went to a very unique college though, where I learned, and at that point in time practiced, a mental technique called Transcendental Meditation. I am usually too exhausted to meditate anymore, but it’s one of my new year’s resolutions to start again.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Jenn Emerling

Where do you find inspiration?

I am constantly inspired by science and nature. It’s just completely insane that our bodies even work. If you understand the mechanics of perception, it becomes more and more clear that every single second is literally a miracle. I know that sounds wild, but I whole heartedly believe that!

What advice would you give to your 21-year-old self?

Start a retirement fund, you idiot!

Here's a crazy music video I directed for an artist who's totally blowing up, Djemba Djemba.

What would you like to be remembered for?

To be totally honest, I would like to be remembered as someone who helped others. Not like in a philanthropic super idealist way. Just in a personal way. I take great interest in incubating the careers of those who work with us, and we always try to understand what our colleagues want for themselves even beyond their careers. It makes me feel really good when I can help someone do what they really want to do.

What’s been the best moment of your career so far?

This one time I was standing on the beach at night in Tulum. This very sweet groom had decided to give our videography services to his bride as a surprise present (which is wildly flattering). But anyway, I was standing there in the moonlight taking a self portrait (see below), geeking out about the fact that clouds are also water, that the star light that fell into my eyes all left their stars at such drastically different times, and that the ocean was literally being pulled up toward that big moon. Maybe it’s because I took a self portrait that I recall this moment so clearly. But it was important. I was overwhelmed with gratitude. That’s probably the best one so far.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?

The travel is really hype, but I think it’s the people I’ve been able to meet and work with. There are so many intrepid, dynamic people out there working. It’s wild! What a wild time in the world, right?! We just get to do whatever we want.

What have been the biggest challenges or obstacles you’ve faced in your business and how did you overcome them?

I fully assume that I haven’t faced them yet, so I’m not sure how I’ll overcome them. Or maybe they’ll just kill me. I’m not sure.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

My grandpa Buzz once told me, ‘Brian sometimes you’ve just got to make a decision and live with it’. I’m a very worrisome person by nature, and I’ve often leaned on his advice. It’s impossible to know which choices will lead us where. But delay, worry, procrastination, flakiness…none of those lead to progress. Sometimes you’ve just got to go.

Her Lovely Heart PROfile interview with Brian Morrow of SharkPig.
Photo: Braedon Flynn

If you could have dinner with any inspiring person (past or present), who would you choose?

Oh jeez. I don’t know. Part of me wants to say The Dalai Lama, but I kind of want to say Ghostface Killa or Dolly Parton. Too tough.

This one is the best. It's my OWN music video. Shot all over the world for free. I'm proud of it.
You can see more of Brian’s work on the Shark Pig website, and follow his adventures via Instagram and Twitter.
PROfile headshot: Rainbeau Tharp

Her Lovely Heart


January 15, 2015

Break old habits in order to generate new ideas

Break old habits in order to generate new ideas. Click through to read.

When running a creative business, we can easily feel doubly burdened with the need to come up with new ideas. Not only do we need to keep developing new ideas for our art, or the way we approach our craft, but we also need constant new ideas for running our business more effectively, or marketing more inventively. This pressure is one of the biggest reasons I started Her Lovely Heart. Not only is it hopefully beneficial and inspirational to you, the reader, but writing about these issues on a weekly basis gives my own idea-generator a good workout, too. And you know what, I’ve found that the more posts I write, and the more questions I answers, the more new ideas keep popping up. It’s become quite clear to me that we all have an endless ability to come up with ideas, but we do need to be actively working on pulling them out.

Intention & action

Intention and action can actually propel you quite far. You only need to look at some of those people who’s success makes you scratch your head, as you may not see the talent in their artistic craft (not saying it’s not there, sometimes these are issues of taste), and yet they seem to be forging ahead at a ferocious speed. Those people are shining examples of how taking action with intention will lead to gaining momentum. I’m not saying that reaching for the sky will always set you flying, but most likely you won’t be treading in the ditch either, that’s just how momentum works.

Idea target

It’s crucial to give your mind a good workout every day. Give yourself a target. Think of a current challenge you’re dealing with (for example: how to structure your pricing or website differently, how to attract more clients, what kind of new products you could offer etc), and decide that you are going to come up with five different ideas for five consecutive days, and stick to it. The first day will be h-a-r-d. But it will get easier, I promise! And somewhere midweek you might notice a shift, like a door opening, and new ideas just start flowing. Don’t judge the ideas, they can be silly or impractical, it only counts that they came from inside your head. Among them, a real diamond may lie.

Break habits

Another way to keep those synopses firing, and preventing your brain from getting stuck in the patterns it likes, you can take simple steps such as changing your everyday routines. Make a list of all of your daily habits, and then plan deliberate changes into your life every day. Here are some examples:

  • Take a different route, or form of transport, when you go grocery shopping.
  • Change your working hours
  • Work on different things every day
  • Listen to a different radio station every day
  • Watch or read your news from a different source
  • Cook foods you’ve never cooked before for a whole week
  • Read completely different book than you would normally choose
  • Go for a swim instead of a run
  • Have a conversation with a new person every day

I hope some of these things have given you a little push into a more routine-breaking-new-idea-generating direction. Remember, don’t let your brain get stuck into a pattern!


Her Lovely Heart


January 14, 2015

Quote of the Week / 19

‘Believing in something is half of making it come true.
The other half is not letting anything stop you.’
~ Corrine De Winter

Corrine de Winter Quote Wallpaper hand-lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Gioia de Antoniis.

This week’s Quote of the Week reminds us of the importance of, not only believing our craziest ideas into reality, but believing in ourselves. If we don’t believe in the value of what we do, how is anyone else going to?

Gioia De Antoniis hand lettered this beautiful Quote of the Week, and you can keep dreaming by downloading these gorgeous original desktop wallpapers.

Corrine de Winter Quote Wallpaper hand-lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Gioia de Antoniis.
Corrine de Winter Quote Wallpaper hand-lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Gioia de Antoniis.

Handlettered for Her Lovely Heart by Gioia De Antoniis. You can also find her on Instagram.

Click here to download Quote Wallpapers by Gioia De Antoniis: Download

 
Do you have a design you’d like to submit for our Goodie Bag? Create one design, or example of a digital product, and email it to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Goodie Bag’. We’ll review your submission and get back to you if it’s a good fit for the site!
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 13, 2015

Modern Calligraphy workshop in London

London Modern Calligraphy Workshop.

Black fingers, mild hissy fits, and a lot of laughter. Last week I attended a Modern Calligraphy Workshop organised by the lovely Chiara Perano of Lamplighter London and Lucy Edmonds of Quill London. I gave the workshop as a Christmas present to my friend (with the added bonus of a date night with me of course!), as I felt like it would be nicer to gift an experience, rather than more stuff that we all probably have enough of.

London Modern Calligraphy Workshop.

Despite holding the dip pen completely upside down in the picture above, it actually felt fairly familiar to my hand (plus resulted in a total old fogie moment when I uttered ‘These things sure have come along a bit in the last… errr.. 20 years!). But yes, I’ve used a dip pen before, but only for artwork and illustration, never for calligraphy. Handwriting in general has never really been my forte… so perhaps it’s finally time to change that!

London Modern Calligraphy Workshop.

I was sat next to an illustrator, which was slightly intimidating to say the least! But it was also fascinating to see how right out of the blocks, everyone who attended had a completely individual style to their lettering.

London Modern Calligraphy Workshop.

I think for a first timer, I wasn’t awful, even though I have no idea how to actually write! Most of all though, the whole evening was such good fun, that despite my hissy about not being instantly amazing at calligraphy, it immediately felt like something I want to keep doing. Of course, I recently also started painting again, so we’ll see how all these new/old hobbies fit into my life!

London Modern Calligraphy Workshop.

You can feel the concentration! There was also laughter, promise.

London Modern Calligraphy Workshop.

Ever since the workshop, I’ve been trying to be a good girl and practise, practise, practise…

Free hand lettered Love wallpaper by Marianne Taylor.

I quite liked how this ‘love’ turned out while I was practising, so I thought I’d make a little wallpaper with it. If you dig it, you can download it, too.

Click here to download ‘Love’ wallpaper by Marianne Taylor: Download


Her Lovely Heart


January 12, 2015

Ask Marianne / 17 / How to deal with negative thoughts & emotions

How to deal with negative thoughts and emotions? Click through to read.
In this series, Her Lovely Heart founder Marianne Taylor answers some of the burning questions submitted by blog readers, spanning everything from photography and business questions to personal mantras. Read on to find out what people are longing to know about…

Q: I’ve been struggling with my photography business due to a change in my circumstances. I feel really depressed about not having enough work, and even though I try to portray a positive attitude, I’m afraid my feelings are catching and are making my situation worse. How can I pull myself out of this funk?

I’m sorry to hear you’re having a hard time! We all go through emotionally difficult times, and it definitely makes it harder to keep up a positive front for our business. Often negative feelings stem from negative thoughts, and once you’re feeling bad, more negative thoughts come up, so it can be a vicious cycle trying to pull yourself out of a funk. First of all, I’m going to give you some ways that could help you deal with negative emotions, and after that I’ll give you a little exercise to try to help you turn negative thoughts into something positive. But first, here are some thoughts on negative feelings.

1 Negative feelings are an invitation for growth

Negative feelings can help pinpoint the places in ourselves we need to do work on. Try taking feelings such as irritation or fear as signs of the areas you need to tackle, instead of trying to ignore them.

2 Let go of the perfect plan

If you’re trying to live in a constant state of pleasure, avoiding any pain, you’re setting yourself up for disappointment. You’ll be always looking over the fence and thinking others have it perfectly together, when that couldn’t be further from the truth.

3 Don’t try to control everything

This is a hard one for me personally. I’m constantly trying to learn to let go and not try to control the outcome of situations in order to feel much happier.

4 Don’t blame other people

Blame is like an invisible wall, which prevents intimacy or authentic communication. It’s so ingrained in our society to find people or issues to blame, that we do it instinctively almost all the time. Placing blame and responsibility for how we’re feeling on others is such a distinctive way of trying to protect ourselves, that we don’t even notice when we turn even our closest relationships into blame games.

5 Feel your feelings

As much as I believe in trying to change your thinking in order to feel more positive, I also believe that if you are feeling down, don’t try to escape from those uncomfortable feelings. It’s such a common thing to do, as no-one wants to feel bad, but if instead we try to stay in the present and embrace the raw feelings for what they are, we can hopefully learn something. Try to connect with the physical side of bad feelings, the tightening of your chest, a throbbing head or a tight throat, stay with it and remember, everyone with a body feels these feelings sometimes, this is a part of being alive, this is going to pass.

6 Own your dark

In order to be able to offer compassion to anyone else, we have to know our own darkness. We have to be able to connect to that shared part of humanity, of being honest about having these dark days, so that we can be fully present for others when they need us, or so that they could be there for us.

So, I promised to give you an exercise, which can help you change your focus by turning negatives thoughts into positive ones. It ties up with the first point on my list, which talked about negative emotions pinpointing things that need to be worked on. Think of fear or discomfort as a compass, or perhaps like the battery display on your mobile phone. You see you’re running out of battery, what do you do? Do you sit there watching the percentage getting lower, feeling depressed it’s happening and fearful of even using your phone, or do you take action and try to find a way to charge your phone? In fact, you might even carry around an emergency battery pack for situations such as this. Think of having a tool for trying to harness your negative thoughts into something positive and manageable, as always having an emotional emergency pack with you.

This exercise is based on theories established by Prescott Lecky, who developed the concept of self-help, and it can be a powerful tool in overcoming self-doubt or fear. First of all, take out your notebook or a piece of paper. Draw a vertical line in the middle, and on the left write down any negative thoughts that come to surface. Read through them, and really analyse them, seeing how you might be blowing some things out of proportion. Then, on the right hand side, substitute all subjective negative thoughts with an objective positive thought.

As quick example:
Negative – I will never be successful.
Positive – I don’t have to measure success on someone else’s standards. As long as I concentrate on taking steps that excite me, I am going in the right direction.

Negative – I’ll most likely fail.
Positive – I don’t need to be perfect. I might learn something new, and I’m allowed to enjoy the journey.

Negative – I don’t have enough self-control to be self-employed.
Positive – I have done well in other areas of my life, so I must have self-control. I’ll just work on it as best as I can, as long as I can. I have as much self-control as anyone else I know. I get to do something I enjoy as a job, which makes time management a fun problem.

Negative – I will never have enough clients.
Positive – I can’t predict the future, but I can work hard and I can learn new things. The thing I need to learn in order to turn things around might be just around the corner. It’s exciting to think how many possibilities there are out there if I’m willing to explore them.

I hope some of these things might have given you a little spark that could enable you to turn your current situation into a learning experience. Just remember, this too shall pass.

Do you have a question about photography or running a business for Marianne? You can email your questions to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Ask Marianne’. The best questions will be answered on the blog throughout this series.
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 9, 2015

Latest from Instagram / 12

Latest from the Her Lovely Heart Instagram feed.

We kicked off a new year on Instagram with some positive thinking.

Latest from the Her Lovely Heart Instagram feed.

The gold fever just doesn’t seem to be subsiding. I guess it’s this time of year, a little shine goes a long way in brightening up the dark days! Still a little bit in love with my iPhone 6 (case from here), and this gorgeous ‘Follow your bliss’ (which are also the words tattooed on the inside of my wrist) notebook from Bis for Bonnie. The Kate Spade range of desk accessories, like this stapler, which Quill also stocks, keeps a desk looking classy. Oh, and that decal of golden circles, which you could grow to fill a whole wall with if you wanted, is from Made of Sundays.

Latest from the Her Lovely Heart Instagram feed.

Let’s do this!

Have you seen our printable Monthly Quotes Calendar for 2015? If you like our Instagram quotes, it’s just the thing you need to help keep you feeling motivated!

If you don’t want to miss any inspiration or latest news, make sure you’re subscribed to our weekly newsletter!

Her Lovely Heart


January 8, 2015

Guest Blog: the importance of feeding creativity with a time out

Guest post by Emily Johnston: feeding creativity with a time-out.

Guest Blogger Emily Johnston is a photographer who loves the sense of freedom travelling gives her. In this post she reminds us of the positive effects taking time out to enjoy life can have on our work.

In the conclusion of my last post, about managing your business while travelling, I mentioned how important it is to take some downtime to rest your mind and body, but to also replenish your creativity. I strongly believe it is very important for all creatives to fill them selves up from the inside out, so that they have more than enough energy to do what they do best – create.

The way you fill yourself up is entirely your choice, all I suggest is that you try to make choices that take care of your mind, body and soul so that you are balanced and complete. Think of the things you do in your downtime as creative fuel: the better quality of activity, the better quality of creative fuel will be produced, and inevitably, the better quality work you will create.

And if replenishing your creativity doesn’t sound like enough of a reason to take some time out, here are five more benefits to you convince you of the importance of down time:

  • helps gain perspective
  • improves your mood
  • increase your concentration
  • reduces frustration
  • helps you sleep better

That’s all very well, you may think, but still feel that you don’t have the time to read a book, take a yoga class, visit an exhibition, take a walk, or to simply just sit and be. Treating ourselves is also often deemed as counterproductive, because too often we have a tendency to go for the external win, glory, fame, or money at the cost of our internal wellness. And that’s because many of us don’t value inner attunement as much as we value outer attainment.

If this is the case for you, then try thinking of your downtime as a fundamental business practise or cost, like having your camera equipment serviced or buying new materials. It’s something you should do if you want your business to benefit and develop. Go as far as scheduling the time in, if need be. The more time and effort you invest in yourself, the more your business will thank you for it.

What is your creative fuel made up of ?

Photo by Emily Johnston.

Her Lovely Heart


January 7, 2015

Quote of the Week / 18

‘You want to look back on life and say, “I can’t believe I did that,”
rather than to look back and say, “I wish I did that”.’
~ Unknown

Her Lovely Heart Quote of the Week hand-lettered by Rosie Harbottle.

This week’s Quote of the Week pushes us on to experience more of what life has got to offer. The best way to get more out of life, is to simply DO more. It doesn’t matter if it doesn’t all turn out perfectly, you’ll still be happier in the end that you did it, rather than only dreamed about it.

Rosie Harbottle hand lettered this beautiful Quote of the Week, and you can keep encouraging yourself to dream bigger with these gorgeous original desktop wallpapers.

Free quote desktop wallpaper hand-lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Rosie Harbottle. Click through to download.
Free quote desktop wallpaper hand-lettered for Her Lovely Heart by Rosie Harbottle. Click through to download.

Handlettered for Her Lovely Heart by Rosie Harbottle. You can see more of Rosie’s lovely work on her website, and follow lots of prettiness via her Instagram.

Click here to download this gorgeous wallpaper set by Rosie: Download

Do you have a design you’d like to submit for our Goodie Bag? Create one design, or example of a digital product, and email it to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Goodie Bag’. We’ll review your submission and get back to you if it’s a good fit for the site!
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 6, 2015

Why list-making is good for business (and life!)

Why list-making is good for business. Click through to read.

Do you know that feeling when you pick up your favourite pen, and tick the last thing off your to-do-list? Isn’t it just the best! To me, the process of writing a list in the first place can be almost as enjoyable. To be perfectly honest, one big reason why I adore list-making is the joy I get from lovely stationery or a cute pen to write lists with. There’s also something magical about writing things down by hand, somehow it makes you feel more accountable. Nevertheless, I do also have a multitude of list-making apps on my phone and computer, each of which I use for different purposes (I listed some in an article about our favourite productivity apps of 2014). You don’t necessarily need to see lists as this binding contract that you’re either managing to keep up with, or feel guilty for falling behind on, lists can purely be a focusing aid. Here are some things I believe list-making can help you with.

1. A list it can help you see the bigger picture.

Seeing all the things you need to do swirling around in your head written down on paper often helps put them into perspective, so you’ll feel less overwhelmed. The process can also help you connect dots that you might not have been able to see when everything was jumbled up in your thoughts.

2. A list helps you to break overwhelming tasks down to smaller pieces.

Once you have those tasks written down, you can make sublist for them (if you are an app user, WorkFlowy is amazing for this), so that a big scary goal becomes a lot more attainable by knowing the next little steps you need to take and focusing on one of those at a time.

3. A list motivates you.

I certainly find lists hugely motivating. It’s such a great feeling to tick those completed tasks off my list, that it makes me want to get there quicker.

4. A list will give you focus.

Having an actual, actionable list will give you a much sharper focus and help you work towards what you want to accomplish.

5. Ticking things off a list gives you joy.

Ticking of things gives you a satisfied feeling that you would miss out on had you not had a list to tick off of. And who doesn’t want to create some extra good feelings for their day.

Why list-making is good for business. Click through to read.

6. Lists help you manage the amount of daily tasks.

Making a to-do-list for each day, and keeping it a reasonable length with only a couple of difficult tasks to complete, will make you a lot more productive. You can keep a master list of all the things you want to complete separately, but keep your daily lists manageable so that you’ll get to enjoy that satisfying feeling of completion every day. I keep my master list/s on the computer, but write the daily lists by hand.

7. Lists can help you ‘fake’ momentum’.

Ok, this one sounds a bit from the left field, but bear with me. I asked my husband what his favourite thing about list-making is and he said ‘listing things you’ve already accomplished and ticking them off’. (Ha. I know we’ve all done it!) At first it didn’t seem like this should really make this particular list, but the more we talked about, it dawned on me that this is not actually such a bad practice. Even if you are ticking things off that you added because you knew you could tick them off, the act of doing so can help you gain a sense of momentum, which will propel you towards completing the other things on your list.

8. Lists keep you accountable to yourself.

When you work for yourself and spend most of the day alone in your office, there’s no sense of being accountable for what you’re getting, or not getting, done. Making lists will help keep you accountable to yourself, as your own boss. Even if we work alone we need some managerial skills, as dealing with ourselves can sometimes be a tricky business of trying to manage moods, distractions and self-deceiving.


Her Lovely Heart


January 5, 2015

Ask Marianne / 16 / How to stand out in a crowd

How to focus on your vision and stand out in a crowd. Click through to read.
In this series, Her Lovely Heart founder Marianne Taylor answers some of the burning questions submitted by blog readers, spanning everything from photography and business questions to personal mantras. Read on to find out what people are longing to know about…

Q: How do you stay focused on sharing your own vision, without being overly influenced by what others are doing? And how do you stand out in a crowd and communicate why your vision differs from any of the other options?

I think you’ve asked and answered your own question! The best way to stand out in a crowd is to do exactly what you suggest – focus on your own vision. I think where your sense of overwhelm stems from is the amount of all manner of influences and stimulants, visual and otherwise, we are constantly bombarded with. Combine that with the pressure of the need to be original. I encourage you to first of all let go of the idea of originality as something that is mystical, or pressures you. Shocking, huh! The thing is, everything has been done before, and at the core, the human experience has changed very little. We take influences from everywhere, and that’s perfectly fine. In fact, I encourage you to embrace all the things that speak to you and inspire you: see, read, watch, borrow, play. Where so called originality lies, is in taking those different influences and arranging them in a way that rings most through to your soul. One tip though, I urge you to do your creative gathering in other fields than your own, focusing too narrowly on what your industry peers are doing has a tendency of closing down your creative ideas, instead of helping to spark new ones.

When it comes to standing out in a crowd and attracting clients who understand and appreciate what you do, below are the top three guidelines I’ve found crucial.

1. Know who you are talking to.

Communicating your point of view starts from knowing who you are communicating to. Figure out who your client is, and talk directly to them. Bare your soul, either by directly sharing the experiences that led you here, or through stories and analogy. Make your ideal clients understand what drives you. Let them picture what an experience with you would feel like and show them the value of what you do and the way you see and arrange the world. The only way to be unique is to stay honest to yourself and to what makes you tick, not just with your art but all the aspects of your business.

2. Believe in your own vision.

There’s a place for humility, but when it comes to your ideas or your craft, stand behind it proudly. No-one will be excited about what you do, if you’re not excited by it. We have an ego for a reason, and in this context the job of the ego is to show others why what you do is special. No-one else is going to do it for you. Having an ego doesn’t have to take away from your kindness.

3. Stop thinking of what you do as a commodity.

If you try to compete with competence, there’s nothing to stop others becoming more competent. Rely on your creativity and your unique point of view, on coming up with ways to do things differently based on who you are. Can you structure your services in a way no-one else does? Can you offer an experience unique to you? Can you create a marketing campaign in a way that it feels like art rather than marketing? You have the advantage of already knowing how to apply your creativity when it comes to your craft, learn to apply your creativity to the way you run and market your business. Be a constant learner, a constant innovator. We all have the same tools at our disposal, what matters is how we use them.

Do you have a question about photography or running a business for Marianne? You can email your questions to submissions@herlovelyheart.com with the subject line ‘Ask Marianne’. The best questions will be answered on the blog throughout this series.
 

Her Lovely Heart


January 2, 2015

Style Files / 1 / Life in full colour

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light Photography.

I have a good feeling about 2015, like it’s going to be an exciting, important year. As much good as there was in 2014, it also felt very heavy as a year, and I’m very much looking forward to feeling lighter and brighter. If nothing else, 2015 will be a year of concentrated effort on my part to bring colour and fun back into my life. One of the ways I’m trying to achieve this is by making an effort to dress in a more fun way again. There was a time when my wardrobe was super colourful, but somehow, it feels like I’ve spent the last decade dressed in black. Well, no more!

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light Photography.

Another way I’m bringing colour back is with my intention to start painting again. I can’t even remember when I last picked up a paintbrush, but it must have been at least a good 16 or so years ago. We’ll see how it turns out, or if I can even do it anymore, but I’m looking forward to the therapeutic and inspiring process of it, rather than the actual outcomes. I’m hoping to share any progress with you guys soon!

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light Photography.
Dress: Gap | Denim jacket: TU by Sainsbury’s | Tights: UK tights | Shoes: Fashionworld

I never really meant to have a ‘my style’ kind of section here on Her Lovely Heart, but then I thought, actually, perhaps it can be inspiring to some of you to see someone who’s not that young, or a perfect size, or with a budget for designer gear, trying to make an effort to dress in a more fun way. For me, playing with clothes (as well as my living space) certainly has a place in the process of staying inspired and feeling that spark for new ideas. Perhaps these kind of posts here and there will transfer some of that spark to you as well! Here’s to a colourful 2015!

Photography: Caught the Light Photography
Make-up: Elbie van Eeden


Her Lovely Heart


December 31, 2014

Happy New Year 2015!

Happy New Year from Her Lovely Heart!

Toot toot! Wishing you all a brilliant New Year! Let’s make it count!


Her Lovely Heart


December 29, 2014

Thank you for everything, 2014!

Marianne Taylor by Caught the Light photography.
Photo: Caught the Light

2014 sure was a whirlwind year! Going through posts from last year, it’s quite overwhelming to see how much has happened in a relatively short time. I feel like I am in such a different place from where I was last January, when I was really struggling to keep all the different balls (and business commitments) up in the air, while not having enough time to focus properly. The contrast to the clarity I feel right now is quite staggering.

This past year, I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing some truly inspirational people for our PROfile series and have many delicious interviews lined up for next year! I also had the honour of sharing inspiring posts from our Guest Bloggers, gave away so many free goodies from different artists in our Goodie Bag series, and shared wise words made into beautiful works of art in our Quote of the Week series. Thank you so much to all the incredible people who collaborated with us, and played a part in building Her Lovely Heart this past year. What’s most exciting to me is that we’re still at the very beginning of everything. Next year will be full of amazing, and taking just a glimpse of my Awesome Planner, aka Editorial Calendar, is making me a little bit giddy. I genuinely can’t wait for 2015 to hit us with full force. Hold on to your hats everyone, it’s going to be a wild ride!

Below is a little recap of what we got up to in 2014. Enjoy!

Her Lovely Heart wedding photography

We organised the most amazing shoot at Aynhoe Park. We shot three looks…

Her Lovely Heart wedding photography

There was the Candy look

Her Lovely Heart wedding photography

And a Romantic look

Her Lovely Heart wedding photography

And a delicious Glitter look

Her Lovely Heart behind the scenes photography

Among some other yet to be released shoots, we got to do behind the scenes photography for the amazing Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott as they shot a Stella McCartney campaign.

Her Lovely Heart Wedding Photography

I did a shoot for Bridal Musings (images on my photography blog) while Sophie came along to shoot behind the scenes coverage.

Her Lovely Heart behind the scenes photography

I gave a super intimate Live What You Love workshop in July.

inspiration-for-your-day

In this post I shared the exact moment which was the turning point for Her Lovely Heart, and from where on the new direction started to take shape. In this post my thoughts were more fully formed.

Her Lovely Heart Styled Garden Party Mixer

In the summer we threw a garden party for the people who have been involved in the birth of Her Lovely Heart. Our little party got featured on Style Me Pretty.

How to navigate emotions in business for artist or sensitive people

I wrote about running a business as an artist or an emotional person.

10 Traits of successful entrepreneurs. Click through to read more.

In this post I explored 10 traits of successful entrepreneurs.

Her Lovely Heart Favourite productivity apps of 2014

I posted a roundup of my favourite productivity apps of 2014, plus wrote this post about how to overcome procrastination.

Free ebook from Her Lovely Heart: Take the leap and plan your perfect day!

There was this article about how you can be the voice of encouragement.

Her Lovely Heart travel photography

I went to Cannes and mused about good branding.

Learn to get comfortable with awkward moments at photoshoots. Click through to read.

I answered quite a few photography-related ‘Ask Marianne‘ questions. This one was about how I approach a photo shoot.

Branding, design and visual Identity on Etsy.

In this article I explored how to use Etsy to create a visual identity for a startup.

Her Lovely Heart Palm Springs collaboration with Alphabet Bags.

In October I was in California for the Adventure Always conference (and packed some cute Alphabet Bags to go with me).

Her Lovely Heart behind the scenes photography

Another Live What You Love workshop took place with the loveliest bunch of attendees.

Change your perspective, change your life.

In this rather personal post I talked about changing your perspective with the power of writing.

How to approach social media as a photographer. Click through to read.

I answered a question about approaching social media as a photographer.

Minna & Millie by Marianne Taylor.

I shared a breathing exercise I often use myself to help me try to catch the now.

Her Lovely Heart: curating a cohesive inspiration board.

In an attempt to feel more focused, I rearranged my inspiration board.

'Focusing on one ideal client gives your business a clear voice.' - Her Lovely Heart

I answered a question about engaging your ideal clients, and we released our Target Client Persona Workbook.

Made of Sundays wall decal.

I added more good vibes to the office with this Made of Sundays wall decal.

Her Lovely Heart #sharethegoodlife hashtag campaign for small business owners. Be the voice of encouragement!

We launched our #sharethegoodlife campaign, and I designed some cute greeting cards to go with it.

How to manage the use (and misuse) of your photos? Click through to read.

There was a question about photographers managing the use of their photos.

Five secrets of success. Click through to read.

We shared our five secrets of success.

How to use Instagram as an artist running a business? Click through to read.

This question about using instagram as an artist running a business got me thinking about how I could do things better myself.

Get into a habit of celebrating your success!

And, finally, I revealed my crazy cat-lady status with this story about Astrid and what we could learn from her about celebrating success.

Thru Your Lens photography workshop January 2015.

Next up for us is the Thru Your Lens photography workshop. If you got a new dSLR for Christmas, and want to know how to make beautiful pictures with it, we can still squeeze you in! (Also, if you book before the end of 2014, you’ll receive a complimentary Awesome Planner for 2015!)


Her Lovely Heart


December 22, 2014

Merry Merry Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas from Her Lovely Heart!

We’re signing off for the holidays and heading towards the chocolate! We hope you all have the loveliest Christmas, and some much-needed downtime with your loved ones. See you on the other side!


Her Lovely Heart